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but in california that is in the tradition and there are others people can build on but if they can look and say okay in order to be really a valuable democratic process something needs to be inclusive and the lubber to it and it needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework for people to say here's how we can do it in our area. we don't have to have town halls we can have oranges and others in california so people can take that inspiration and use it wherever they are and hopefully i think in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversations. >>> rosemary gibson reports on the creation of the patient protection and affordable care act and its recent passage and fiscal affect on the federal government. this is just over an hour. it's a pleasure to be here. thanks to you at st. peter's university hospital for the opportunity to be here today. the topic today's health care reform. it's based on the book and the principal author called the battle for health care obama as reform for america's future is a nonpartisan analysis of health care reform and we are headed. i appro
of california. this will be cosponsored by the english department and the african-american studies department. and we are acknowledged their generosity for bringing up to this historical room. that everybody would be able to find it. it's like a landmark. the great poets of the road, great of the world. we want to welcome richard hudson, professor to preaching on behalf of this department. he was professor emeritus and a member of the affiliated faculty of the american studies program and interdisciplinary program that was key founder 25 years ago. he came to you see berkeley's english department in 1964 and retired in 2009. although he's continued teaching until this summer. his special interest has been american cultural history, especially from the civil war to world war one. he's now president of the western literature association will host 300 to 400 people in berkeley at the annual conference in october of 2013 and practices good luck with that. [laughter] >> i basically just want to say a word. you happen to be in the jewel room of an edge department. this department has, unlike other
things that money can't buy. if you're sentenced to a jail term in santa barbara, california -- just in case that happens to any one of you -- [laughter] you should know that if you don't like the standard accommodations, you can buy a prison cell upgrade. laugh -- [laughter] it's true. for how much, do you suppose? how much do you think it costs? >> $5,000? it's on a nightly basis. $90 a night. or if you're a tourist, suppose you go to washington, d.c., you want to sit in on a congressional hearing, but there may be a very long line if it's a popular hearing, and you might like standing on long lines. you can now go to a company called line-standing.com -- [laughter] pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone -- usually a homeless person or someone who needs the work -- to hold the place online for hours and hours, overnight if need be, and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go into the hearing room. the same thing, you can do the same thing, by the way, if you want to sit in on an oral argument before the u.s. supreme court. linestandin
bookstores in america like cody's bookstore in berkeley, california, was firebombed. at a bookstore in london that was firebombed toys. bookstores all over the world that were attacked, not just burn but actually people going into bookstores and threatening people working there. and in publishing companies and then, well, the great tragedy was the books, the japanese translator, was murdered at his university in japan. and there was intent to murder and norwegian publisher and the italian translator of the book, for both fortunately survived. but this was a shooting war. and the point is that in all these cases, the evidence that emerged showed that these were professional hits. >> this was not spontaneous. >> no, no. these were professional hits. and so basically the danger was very high. until this moment in around the turn-of-the-century, when we finally managed to get the iranians to back down. and at the point at which we are convinced certain that the action had stood down these gangs of killers, really most of the danger went away. >> dr. hatchett and to this next question. what is the
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4